Articleequal opportunities

Who narrates the world?

Research has long demonstrated a gender gap in who writes and produces the news, but less is still known about how it has materialized online.

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For the last three years, The OpEd Project has conducted a Byline Survey to get a sense of who is getting heard in public discourse.  We are primarily interested in the ideas and the individuals that are driving resources and talent, public policy and opinion.  In other words, we are interested in who narrates the world.  On a practical level we are interested in commentary forums because they predict leadership and thought leadership at the highest levels in all fields.  We see commentary as the beginning of a larger conversation about influence.

Read more on the opedproject blog